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March 12, 2019

 

Washington Update

Administration Proposes Cuts to Water Reuse Funding

House Bill Reauthorizes EPA Water Recycling Program, Clean Water SRF

Join Us in Washington, DC for the National Water Policy Fly-In, Register Today

Advocacy Action Needed! Ask Your Member of Congress to Support Investments in Water Reuse

Congressional Hearing Discusses Funding for Water Infrastructure, Including Reuse

 

State Updates and Member Spotlight

California: Commentary Explains Why Reuse Makes More Sense than Importing Water

A commentary published last week by Robert Glennon, a university professor and author, praises the work that California is doing in increasing the amount of water it reuses and reducing its reliance on imported water. Southern California traditionally imports water from the Sierra Nevada, the Colorado River or elsewhere to augment what is available locally, which can be expensive and face environmental objections. Glennon argues that the recent announcement from Los Angeles that it has set an aspirational goal to recycle all of its wastewater by 2035 demonstrates California is discovering that wastewater has incredible value. Read More.

California: Olivenhain Converts HOA to Recycled Water

WateReuse Association member Olivenhain Municipal Water District (OMWD) is providing recycled water to the Del Rayo Downs Homeowner Association (HOA) in Rancho Santa Fe. OMWD is working with large irrigators on the benefits of retrofitting their irrigation systems for recycled water use including schools, homeowner associations and golf courses. Del Ray Downs’ conversion to recycled water enables the HOA to save money on its monthly water bill while decreasing costly imported water demands by approximately 16.5 acre-feet annually. Read More.

Oklahoma: Bartlesville Moves Forward with First Water Reuse Project

WateReuse Association member Tetra Tech has been contracted to begin designing the first water reuse project for City of Bartlesville, including a water reuse pump station, pipeline, and renovation of the water intake structure located on the Caney River. The design work will be completed by February 2020. In 2001, the area experienced a sustained drought where there were only six months of water remaining in Hulah Lake, which triggered a number of studies. The community currently pumps 7 million gallons of treated effluent into the Carney River. Under the proposal, half of the effluent would be diverted for reuse. Read More.

Virginia: Hampton Roads Aquifer Recharge Project Gets Stricter Oversight

Governor Ralph Northam signed legislation that establishes the Potomac Aquifer Recharge Oversight Committee to monitor Hampton Roads Sanitation District’s (HRSD) plan to refill the Potomac Aquifer with purified water. The 10-person advisory committee is required to meet at least quarterly during its first three years of existence, and HRSD would fund the committee during that time. The legislation also creates the Potomac Aquifer Recharge Monitoring Laboratory under the direction of faculty from two Virginia universities. The lab will monitor the project’s effect on the aquifer, manage test data, and conduct testing and analysis of the water. HRSD plans to build the program’s first full-scale treatment facility by the end of 2023. Read More.

 

Research Update

U.S. Faces Fresh Water Shortages Will Create a Driver for Increased Reuse

The pressures of climate change and population growth could cause water shortages in most of the United States, according to preliminary government-backed research. As many as 96 water basins out of the 204 supplying most of the country with freshwater could fail to meet monthly demand starting in 2071, a team of scientists said in the journal Earth’s Future. Water shortages would result from increased demand by a growing population, as well shrinking rainfall totals and greater evaporation caused by global warming. Read More.

 

Association Update

WateReuse Association Celebrates 2018 Milestones in Annual Report

In 2018, the WateReuse Association expanded membership, increased outreach, and strengthened advocacy to meet a growing interest in water recycling, as illustrated in the 2018 Annual Report. There were notable successes at the national level and within state sections, including popular events and successful engagement with regulators and legislators. The association also engaged in strategic partnerships to extend its reach of education and advocacy priorities. To learn more, read the 2018 Annual Report.

 

Conferences and Events

Webcast: What are the Best Opportunities for Industrial Water Reuse?

Please join us on March 13 at 2 pm eastern to learn which industries are investing in water reuse and in what ways. Learn about new data from Bluefield Research that will reveal reuse strategies for key industries, drivers for investment in reuse, the best geographic opportunities for industrial reuse, how industries are collaborating with municipalities, and more. Register Now!

Webcast: Advancing the Seawater Desalination Knowledge Base

Please join us on March 14 at 3 p.m. eastern to learn about the latest advancements in seawater desalination via reverse osmosis. Presented in partnership with The Water Research Foundation, this webcast will discuss two recent studies that explore advancements in seawater desalination from pretreatment to integration of desalinated water into water systems. Register Now!

Save the Date: 34th Annual WateReuse Symposium in San Diego, California

Mark your calendar for the 34th Annual WateReuse Symposium is in San Diego, California on September 8-11, 2019. This year’s theme is “Collaborate to Innovate.” We will showcase recycled water collaborations among utilities, farmers, and industry; regulators working together at both the state and federal level; sustainability; public/private partnerships; and, for the first time, the latest in reuse research led by the Water Research Foundation. Learn More.

Upcoming Events

Apr
15
Wed
WateReuse Pacific Northwest Meeting
Apr 15 all-day
Webcast: Breaking Down Implementation Barriers for Onsite Non-Potable Water Systems
Apr 15 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Webcast: Breaking Down Implementation Barriers for Onsite Non-Potable Water Systems

Presented in partnership with The Water Research Foundation, this presentation will cover key components of successful onsite non-potable water systems.

Webcast
2:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern ; 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific
WateReuse Members and WRF Subscribers: Free
Others: $49
PDHs: 1

Register Now!

Across the nation, onsite non-potable water systems (ONWS) are becoming increasingly common as a means to conserve and recycle water. Ensuring consistent implementation is one of the principal challenges for ONWS programs, particularly when multiple, new stakeholders are involved. Water Research Foundation project 4909 sought to identify key knowledge gaps and provide the resources needed to aid in the smooth implementation of ONWS. Through interaction with the National Blue Ribbon Commission for Onsite Non-potable Water Systems, the project team identified common pitfalls that have impacted the design, operation, permitting, and implementation of ONWS.

This presentation will cover key components of a successful ONWS program including: (1) treatment goals that control public health risk, (2) effective design of both treatment and non-treatment (i.e., management) barriers, (3) strategies for effective operation and monitoring of ONWS systems, and (4) frameworks for regulating and permitting ONWS. The goal of this presentation is to convey the importance of stakeholder knowledge for consistent protection of public health at ONWS installations. This information will be presented through a survey of the projects two main deliverables: the comprehensive guidance manual and interactive training modules.

Presenters

  • Brian Pecson, Ph.D., P.E., Principal Engineer, Trussell Technologies
  • Brie Post, P.E., Senior Engineer, Trussell Technologies
  • Paula Kehoe, Director of Water Resources, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
Apr
21
Tue
Webcast: America’s Water Infrastructure Act – Implications for Water Reuse and COVID-19
Apr 21 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Are water recycling utilities well prepared to address the COVID-19 crisis and other potential future risks?

Join Us!
2:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern ; 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific
WateReuse Members: Free
Others: $49
PDHs: 1

Register Now!

The America’s Water Infrastructure Act (AWIA) requires all utilities serving 3,300 or more people to complete a risk and resilience assessment (RRA) for their water systems, followed by the completion of an emergency response plan (ERP). The RRA’s are part of an overall effort to improve the ability of water systems to prepare for and respond to events from water resource limitations to cyber attacks, from extreme weather to an assault on the utility, and from contamination to treatment and distribution infrastructure, among others. In short, it is an all-hazards approach to managing risk.

This webcast will discuss how water reuse interacts with the RRAs and highlight some the ways that risks are viewed and managed from an AWIA perspective. It will also discuss how we are interpreting and acting upon risk in the midst the COVID-19 pandemic crisis and how we can use RRAs to prepare for future risks. This webcast will offer a fresh look at risk and resilience through the lens of preparation and response. The presentation will begin with an overview of AWIA requirements, RRAs, and the role of water reuse in those assessments followed by a focus on risk and risk perceptions in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Presenters

Dr. Ben Stanford is an Associate Vice President with Hazen and Sawyer in the Denver office where he leads the implementation of innovations in water, wastewater, and water reuse. He is currently leading or supporting over a dozen risk and resilience projects in FL, NC, TX, CO, AZ, and CA.

Dr. Douglas Crawford-Brown is Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was Founding Director of the Institute for the Environment, and at the University of Cambridge, where he was Director of the Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research.

Apr
24
Fri
Central Valley/Sierra Foothills Chapter Meeting
Apr 24 all-day
May
1
Fri
Orange County Chapter Meeting @ Santa Margarita Water District
May 1 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
May
28
Thu
Section Meeting & Webinar at Stantec
May 28 @ 10:00 am

Section Meeting & Webinar at Stantec
– featuring Brian Biesemeyer, Scottsdale Water “Arizona’s First Direct Potable Reuse System”

Jun
9
Tue
Los Angeles Chapter Meeting
Jun 9 all-day
Jun
17
Wed
WateReuse Pacific Northwest Meeting
Jun 17 all-day
Jun
18
Thu
Orange County Chapter Meeting @ TBD
Jun 18 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Jul
15
Wed
WateReuse Pacific Northwest Meeting
Jul 15 all-day

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