Home\Webcasts\Unconventional Oil and Gas Exploration: Outlook for Water Reuse and Potential Impacts on Distribution Pipes

Unconventional Oil and Gas Exploration: Outlook for Water Reuse and Potential Impacts on Distribution Pipes

When:
May 9, 2018 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
2018-05-09T14:00:00-04:00
2018-05-09T15:00:00-04:00

Webcast
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Eastern
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific
PDHs: 1
Fee: WateReuse members and WRF subscribers: Free; Others: $49

Register Now!

What is the current state of water reuse in unconventional oil and gas? And what are the impacts of fracking and crude oil contaminants on water distribution pipes? Join us on Wednesday, May 9 at 2 p.m. EDT to hear results from two Water Research Foundation studies on unconventional oil and gas that cover opportunities and challenges for water reuse and protection of public health.

The webcast will discuss:

  • Challenges associated with water management in the oil and gas sector
  • Treatment technologies for oil and gas wastewater
  • Prospects for water reuse in the oil and gas sector
  • Case studies where oil and gas wastewater has been used for beneficial purposes

And with the increasing transport of petroleum products across the U.S., as well as the expanding footprint of oil and gas exploration activities, drinking water utilities need to improve the ability to detect contaminated water before it enters facilities. You will learn the types of chemicals that could be spilled into raw water sources, pass through water treatment facilities, and enter the drinking water distribution system—as well as strategies for ensuring public health.

Presenters

  • Christopher Bellona, PhD, Colorado School of Mines
  • Andrew J. Whelton, PhD, Purdue University

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WateReuse is the only trade association that focuses solely on advancing laws, policy and funding to increase water reuse. Our niche strategy sets us apart from other organizations in the water industry.

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