Home\WateReuse Florida\Journey from Indirect Potable Reuse to Direct Potable Reuse: Technologies & Regulations

Journey from Indirect Potable Reuse to Direct Potable Reuse: Technologies & Regulations

When:
August 8, 2016 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
2016-08-08T14:00:00-04:00
2016-08-08T15:00:00-04:00

WRFL_Xylem-425

Webcast
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EDT
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT
PDHs: 1
Members: Free; Nonmembers: $49

Register Now!

Communities across Florida are looking toward potable water reuse as a smart investment solution to ensure potable supply and reduce nutrients discharging to receiving waters. Purified water technology is successfully and safely underway across the United States, using a wide variety of technologies for groundwater recharge, surface water augmentation, and now for direct potable reuse (DPR).

WateReuse Florida is sponsoring a series of webinars to share expert knowledge on this critical topic. The inaugural presentation will provide a national perspective on water quality, public health, and treatment methods.

Jeff Mosher will review the challenges of creating a national framework for direct potable water reuse and highlight regional potable water reuse (direct and indirect) regulatory differences. Andy Salveson will review the water quality goals for potable water reuse (direct and indirect potable water reuse), review treatment technologies for potable water reuse, and highlight the critical role of several key treatment components, including ozone, UV, and (when used) Reverse Osmosis (RO).

Presenters

salvesonAndrew Salveson is Vice President and Water Reuse Practice Lead at Carollo Engineers.

mosherJeff Mosher is Executive Director of the National Water Research Institute (NWRI), a 501(c) 3 nonprofit located in Fountain Valley, CA.

 

 

 

 

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WateReuse is the only trade association that focuses solely on advancing laws, policy and funding to increase water reuse. Our niche strategy sets us apart from other organizations in the water industry.

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