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President Biden’s Job Plan Invests over $100 billion in Water Infrastructure, Including Water Reuse

Date: April 01, 2021

On March 31, President Biden unveiled an infrastructure plan that calls for an investment of over $100 billion in the nation’s water and wastewater infrastructure, including water recycling to help communities maximize resiliency. The White House is touting the American Jobs Plan as a vision to rebuild the economy and create jobs through investment in infrastructure and climate.

Specific water-related investments called-out in the eight-year plan include:

  • $45 billion in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund and in Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (WIIN) grants to replace the nation’s lead pipes and service lines;
  • $56 billion in grants and low-cost flexible loans to states, Tribes, territories, and disadvantaged communities to modernize drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater systems in rural communities; and
  • $10 billion in funding to monitor and remediate PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) in drinking water and to invest in rural small water systems and household well and wastewater systems, including drainage fields. 

The President’s plan also calls for $50 billion for investments in programs to help communities build resilient land and water resources to tackle extreme weather events, including programs to provide funding for the western drought crisis by investing in water efficiency and recycling programs. WateReuse will monitor the progress of the proposal and provide further analysis in Monday’s WateReuse Review newsletter.

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